Downplaying symptoms: just pretend it’s NOT a heart attack


Heart Sisters

by Carolyn Thomas  @HeartSisters

When a blockage or spasm in one or more of your coronary arteries stops allowing freshly oxygenated blood to feed your heart muscle, a heart attack can happen. The faster that you can access emergency treatment to address that culprit artery, the better your chance of survival.  The period of time between your first symptoms and actively getting the help you need can be divided into three phases:

  1. decision time – the period from the first onset of acute symptoms to the decision to seek care (for example, calling 911)
  2. transport time – the period from the decision to seek care to arrival at the Emergency Department
  3. therapy timethe period from arrival at the Emergency Department to the start of medical treatment

Only the first phase is the one you have complete control over. So don’t blow it.

View original post 1,620 more words

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2 thoughts on “Downplaying symptoms: just pretend it’s NOT a heart attack

  1. Thanks Beth for reblogging my Heart Sisters post here. This topic of women’s “treatment-seeking delay behaviour” – even in mid-heart attack – is a distressingly (and dangerously) common phenomenon. Thanks for helping to spread the word to your readers here.
    regards,
    C.

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